What industries does OAKwave service?

The Short Answer:
All of them, but we specialize in B2B (though we have had MANY B2C clients as well, it’s just not our core strength).  We have a penchant for franchise sales, SaaS, medical, and manufacturing.  But, only because we’ve had clusters of clients in each of those areas.  As long as the nature of the challenge is marketing, sales, or business, we’re specialized there.  This requires a lot more work on our part, but we know your industry like our own by the end of our process.

The Long Answer:
We don’t specialize.  In a specialized agency relationship, the client pays the ultimate price. Basically, a client is paying a lower price for access to a template, or formula, by which they can execute their marketing. Since this template has literally zero emotional connection with the target audience and is reused over and over and over, it is effective at the moment it is being executed (if the odds are in your favor) and ineffective in building the brand or anything with staying power. There are exceptions to this, but they are just that, diamonds in the rough. It does not build the brand behind the marketing or proliferate a unique differentiation. Why is that important? Authors greater than me have written literal tomes about the necessity of competitive differentiation.

There's an old adage about being an inch deep and a mile wide versus a mile deep and an inch wide.  In marketing, it was always meant to be a mile wide and inch deep.  If you put all of your eggs in one basket, one approach, chances are high that the tech will change or the market will change or the industry will change or something will break everything.

In marketing, and in business, you never allow yourself in a position in which all of your leads will be cut off in one swoop.  When did that become acceptable?  Campaigns were born from the idea of attacking on multiple fronts with a unified message.  Attacking on one or two fronts with a varied message?  Or no real message at all?  How does that make any sense?  Even if you have the same message, you still are putting all your eggs in one basket.  That's not just bad marketing, that's bad business.

The moment we start commoditizing and templating what should be more creativity than anything is the moment we destroy it.

What happens in 99% of these templated relationships is that the client ends up paying for something that they can barely afford or understand.  It\ yields little to no lasting results, or mediocre results that stop as soon as they stop paying. There is no originality in any of their advertising or campaigns. There is no genuine thought leadership. Hell, there is no original thought. It’s marketing on the rinse-and-repeat cycle.

What was and still could be the industry with the most opportunity to evolve our society as a whole, is also the one responsible for society’s regression.


If you liked the "long answer," check out the book written by our CEO, Bad Marketing:  Our industry is turning into a monster!